Wooster Public Library and Museum

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Wooster Public Library and Museum
Type Libraries (Public); Museum
Industry Information
Fate Dissolved
Predecessor(s) Wooster Free Library Association
Successor(s) Wayne County District Public Library
Founded Wooster, Ohio (May 1905 (1905-05))
Founder(s) Women's Christian Association
Headquarters Wooster, Ohio, United States
Number of locations 304 N. Market St., Wooster, Ohio
Key people Della M. Dice, 1905-?; Mrs. George Schwartz; Miss Harriet M. Whitford; Miss Lucy Sabolt; Dr. John A. Gann; Professor Charles Haupert
Wooster Public Library and Museum
General information
Location Wooster, Ohio
Address 304 N. Market St.
Town or city Wooster, Ohio
Country United States
Completed May 1905
Technical details
Floor count 2 story (Columbus dark grey brick building)
Design and construction
Architect Vernon Redding, Mansfield, Ohio
Main contractor John H. King, Galion, Ohio
Other information
Facilities 1st floor: Library; 2nd floor Museum
'"Public library is being transformed from the monumental institution of a few decades past to a place of practical service. Instead of a library becoming a place of storage of books, merely for their own sake, it becomes a place for exchange of information of any kind that the members of the community may desire to obtain." -- Miss Eugenia Glenn

In 1903, the Trustees asked Mr. James Mullins, one of the trustees, to write to Andrew Carnegie asking for funds for a new building. He did and soon received a reply offering $12,000 for the building project. The Trustees felt that this was insufficient and Mr. Mullins, at their urging, wrote again and asked for $15,000. Mr. Carnegie agreed, with the requirement that Wooster raise $500 a year for the building's maintenance.

The Trustees bought property on the northwest corner of Market and Larwill Streets from John Fawcett Larwill. The building was designed by architect Vernon Redding of Mansfield and build by John King of Galion. The total cost of the project was $23,000 which included: architect's fee of $525, land purchase $4,500, building cost $14,262 and the remainder reported as miscellaneous expenses which included heating, plumbing, furniture, etc. In May 1905 the building was dedicated. Although Carnegie funds were responsible for the construction of the buildings, the library was never designated as a Carnegie Library.

Locations[edit | edit source]

City Directories[edit | edit source]

"For a public library to be handicapped in service during a period of unprecedented unemployment is a sad commentary on our democracy" -- Article in The Daily Record, March 1933

Comprehensive History[edit | edit source]

In 1903, the Trustees asked Mr. James Mullins, one of the trustees, to write to Andrew Carnegie asking for funds for a new building. He did and soon received a reply offering $12,000 for the building project. The Trustees felt that this was insufficient and Mr. Mullins, at their urging, wrote again and asked for $15,000. Mr. Carnegie agreed, with the requirement that Wooster raise $500 a year for the building's maintenance.

The Trustees bought property on the northwest corner of Market and Larwill Streets from John Fawcett Larwill. The building was designed by architect Vernon Redding of Mansfield and build by John King of Galion. The total cost of the project was $23,000 which included: architect's fee of $525, land purchase $4,500, building cost $14,262 and the remainder reported as miscellaneous expenses which included heating, plumbing, furniture, etc. In May 1905 the building was dedicated. Although Carnegie funds were responsible for the construction of the buildings, the library was never designated as a Carnegie Library.

With the new building and new librarian came new hours and rules. The library was open daily from nine to nine except Sunday when it was open from one to four. All persons, over eight years of age who were residents of Wooster and the Wooster School District were permitted to borrow books. Residents of Wayne County outside the district could also borrow books by paying an annual fee of $1.00.

The library collection grew during this period and by 1911, a card catalog was in place. The collection included 6,317 books; 29 monthly and 8 weekly magazines; and six daily and three weekly newspapers.

Interest in the second floor museum also increased. Mr. Mullins had donated his collection of stuffed birds to the museum in 1910 and the museum acquired many Wayne County relics. Dr. J. H. Todd's collection of Ohio archaeological specimens and Rev. Jacob Reis' relics of Cameron in West Africa became part of the museum. The museum officially opened in 1918 and remained a popular part of the library until it was moved to the Wayne County Historical Society in 1958.

During World War I, the public library collaborated with the College of Wooster Library to send books to the soldiers in camps in North Carolina, Virginia, and New Jersey.

Contagious diseases caused the library to close several times during the early years. It was closed in January and February 1901 and January 1915. The longest closings were in the fall and winter of 1918-1919. Spanish influenza spread across Europe and came to the United States with the returning World War I soldiers. The entire country, including Wayne County, Ohio was effected. The library was only open seven days in October, nineteen in November and closed in December and January.

In 1922, Miss Myrtle Allen resigned the position as librarian that she had held since 1909. Mrs. Eugenia {{Surname|Glenn]] began her position as librarian on September 1, 1923 and would continue until 1944. Mrs. Glenn had been educated at Vassar and the Carnegie Library School. she gave teachers reading lists of 30 books for students in grades three through six. The students were to read and report on four books each month and receive credit on their report cards. She spoke to parent-teacher groups and actively promoted cooperation between the schools and the library. In 1923, the first story hour for young children was held. In 1925, the library opened its first branch in the high school. In the fall of 1923, all third through six grade students in Wooster Schools were required to visit the library and museum.

In 1929, the board adopted a new policy for library employment.There would be one full time librarian and one full time assistant, both were to be graduates of accredited library schools.

The Depression years of 1931-33 were lean for the library. Loans from the citizens national Bank and contributions from interested residents helped supplement the reduced tax collections. The library was able to stay open although the hours were reduced.

1933 was the beginning of county wide extension service with free library service being extended to all county residents. In 1934, county teachers could borrow twelve books for classroom use. By 1935, fifty six school rooms were supplied with library books. Extension work had become an integral part of the library and provisions had been made in the budget for a collection of books for the county.

In 1936 deposit stations were established in the Fredericksburg School, the Rittman High School, various homes in Marshallville, and the city hall in Smithville. The next year found deposit stations in Sterling, West Salem, Dalton, and Apple Creek.

On June 5, 1937, the first branch library opened in Rittman. he already existing Shreve library came under Wooster supervision November 5, 1938. The Creston branch opened June 13, 1939. A volunteer library operating in Doylestown, with Wooster Library books, was officially made a branch in 1941.

The first bookmobile service was started on October 3, 1940 with the first trip being taken to Fredericksburg.

World War II brought changes to the library. Shortages in material and personnel were felt by the library. Several library employees were either called into service or went to work in defense plants. Gas rationing affected bookmobile service. It was difficult for the library to purchase books and periodicals because of paper shortages. Again, as in World War I, the library collected books to send to various military bases.

In 1941, Wooster Schools took over operation of the high school library and the public library placed greater emphasis on its younger patrons. Second grade students were given library instruction before their first cards were issued and more picture books were purchased and displayed to interest younger children and their parents.

On August 5, 1943 Mrs. Glenn resigned as head librarian. Helen Sebeika, the children's librarian, assumed the head librarian position. Hampered by what she felt was an insufficient collection, Miss Sebeika attempted to strengthen the branches. In 1945, the library received a $500 grant from the State of Ohio for outstanding extension service. The rules of the library had not been officially changed since 1905. Trustees voted to make changes in May 1945. All county residents were entitled to receive library cards and children upon completing the first grade were able to obtain their first card. Hours were set at noon to nine weekdays and ten to nine on Saturday.

Miss Ruth Minglin became head librarian in January 1946 replacing Miss Sebeika and her interim successor Miss Bernath. Miss Minglin resigned in March 1947 and Miss Mary Merritt was named the next head librarian.

Under Miss Merritt, the budget was increased and film service, by contract with the Cleveland Public Library, was started. In addition, a new bookmobile was ordered, the collection expanded, and salaries improved. In 1948, the first discussion of organizing the library as a county district was held. The board agreed to study the situation taking no action until 1958.

On August 31, 1956, Miss Merritt resigned and Miss Katherine Schantz became head librarian.

Through the 1950s, services to county residents had been increased through the extension department and through open borrowing privileges. However, no legal jurisdiction had changed and county residents had no representation on the Board. In 1958 the Friends Groups of both Rittman and Doylestown asked the board to make the change to a county district library.

The Trustees felt this was an unwise move and controversy raged throughout the county for several months. Amid threats of a motion to be placed on the ballot in November and publicity that extended beyond the county, the Board of Trustees, after considerable debate and negotiations, finally signed a resolution on November 18, 1959 that would change the legal status of the library. On January 1, 1960, the Wayne County District Public Library was created.


Departments[edit | edit source]

Board of Trustees WCPL Library[edit | edit source]

Administration[edit | edit source]

Annual Reports[edit | edit source]

  • 1910 - Miss Myrtle Allen card catalog placed in the reading room, a collection of 6,317 books along with 29 monthly, 8 weekly magazine and 6 daily and 3 weekly newspapers. The reading room was open each weekday for 7 hours and "Sabbath afternoon" for two hours. No statistics were kept, but the reference department seemed used twice as much as any previous year.
    • The loan of books to teachers begun when the library became a school district library was continued with the purchase of books solely for use in schools.
    • A traveling library department was established during this year and for each month of the year, a collection of from 30 to 50 books in a small books case was sent to each school in the city. These books could be taken home by the students so a basis for the school branches to be established in th 1920's and later was made.
    • 408 borrower's for 1910 (including 6 non-residents for a total of 2,45 borrowers. In all, 21,453 books were circulated with nearly twice as many being borrowed by adults as children. [1]
  • 1920 - Number of borrowers increased to 3,696; Circulating 35,596 (24,407 were fiction).
  • 1922 - During Miss Myrtle Allen's last year as librarian, $60.96 was collected from the duplicate pay collect she had initiated. The public library was growing and ready to expand its service under a new librarian.
  • 1924 - Mrs. Eugenia Glenn became librarian on September 1, 1923 until 1944. She served as librarian longer than any other person in its history. She advocated even closer co-operation with the schools and teaching of library science to prepare students to use the library. [2]
  • 1925 - In her annual report Mrs. Eugenia Glenn again expressed her ideas and hopes for changes in the coming years. "Public library is being transformed from the monumental institution of a few decades past to a place of practical service. Instead of a library becoming a place of storage of books, merely for their own sake, it becomes a place for exchange of information of any kind that the members of the community may desire to obtain. [3]
  • 1928 - 139 Non-residents outside the Wooster school district.

Directors of Library WCPL[edit | edit source]

Children and Young Adults[edit | edit source]

  • 1929 - September 1, Miss Beatrice MacDonald later became Miss Beatrice Graham as first assistance librarian [4]
  • 1933 - June, Miss Beatrice Graham resigned as Children's librarian. Services still continued even through this transition. Miss Euphemia Nesbitt took her place as a Children's librarian, part-time.
  • 1933 - A book week was sponsored, books were distributed to teachers as usual, but the story hours were discontinued because of the reduced hours. The Child Conservation League sponsored 1 story hour in December.
  • 1937 - Miss Euphemia Nesbitt the children's librarian, reported that with the increased staff the story hours were resumed and an average of 37 children attended. [5]
  • 1941 - Miss Euphemia Nesbitt married and Helen Sebeika took her place. [6]
  • 1941 - New strategies were made to interest parents of preschool and primary school children in books. More picture books were purchased and displayed. Groups of Second grade children were given library instruction before issued their first library card. [7]
  • 1943 - Children's librarian Helen Sebeika moved to Head librarian.
  • 1948 - January, Miss
  • 1948 - April, Mrs. Shirley Sippola was hired as Children's librarian. Mrs. Sippola reported story hours had been held during the year with a total attendance of 633 children. Summer story hour was held at the [city parks] through the partnership of the Wooster YMCA. Schools receiving collection from the library were St. Mary's and Bowman Street school. [8]
  • 1948 - The Children's librarian had been held book talks for parents at various child study groups convincing them of the advantage of the library to their children. [9]

Summer Reading Club Themes[edit | edit source]

Extension Service[edit | edit source]

  • 1935 - A budget was set to provide equipment, room in the basement of the library for a collection of books for county extension. Much work was done during the summer in starting this collection library. The library was promised $2,000 from county funds for the work and also $500-$700 from the State Aid Funds which had been made available by the Ohio State Legislature in 1933.
  • 1941 - July, William E. Bartel, first extension librarian was called to Army camp. Replaced by Helen Vallish was able to drive the bookmobile. [10]
  • 1942 - October, Priscilla Johnson County extension librarian and resigned March 1944. [11]
  • 1945 - Up to this point Branches received no budget of their own. They were provided books and librarians from the Main library. The buildings were funded by the towns they were located in. At times, too little supervision and help from Wooster a problem Helen Sebeika hoped to solve. [12]
  • 1945 - Up to this point Branches received no budget of their own. They were provided books and librarians from the Main library. The buildings were funded by the towns they were located in. At times, too little supervision and help from Wooster a problem Helen Sebeika hoped to solve. [13]
  • 1947 - February, Mrs. Faith Stoughton was hired as County librarian.
  • 1948 - Wayne County donated $300 toward a new bookmobile. The branches were still under the supervision of the County librarian and visited them once a month. * 1948 - Wayne County donated $300 toward a new bookmobile. The branches were still under the supervision of the County librarian and visited them once a month. [14]
  • 1950 - May, Mrs. Faith Stoughton resigned as County librarian. Replaced by Lawrence Huber as County librarian. [15]
  • 1951 - New service added was to bring books and a way to read them while in bed was brought to hospital patients. [16]

Bookmobile Library[edit | edit source]

  • 1910 - Miss Myrtle Allen annual reports noted:
    • The loan of books to teachers begun when the library became a school district library was continued with the purchase of books solely for use in schools.
    • A traveling library department was established during this year and for each month of the year, a collection of from 30 to 50 books in a small books case was sent to each school in the city. These books could be taken home by the students so a basis for the school branches to be established in the 1920's and later was made. [17]
  • 1939 - Fall, County Budget Commission granted $1,500 for the purchase of the library's first bookmobile. The truck was manufactured by Indiana Body Company of Richmond, Indiana. [18]
  • 1940 - September 3rd week, the bookmobile was put on exhibit at the Wayne County Fair for all residents to see. [19]
  • 1940 - October 3, The first bookmobile stop was Fredericksburg, Ohio which also was the first Deposit station. In the last 3 months of the year the number of registration of borrowers from the bookmobile came to 2,874. William E. Bartels was appointed librarian of extension including the bookmobile. [20]
  • 1942 Gas rationing affected the operation of the Bookmobile. [21]
  • 1948 - Mrs. Faith Stoughton reported that the bookmobile had been serving 16 communities for the past 2 years, visiting every 3 weeks. Circulation was 145,731 up 6,500 from the previous year. [22]
  • 1948 - Wayne County donated $300 toward a new bookmobile. The branches were still under the supervision of the County librarian and visited them once a month. * 1948 - Wayne County donated $300 toward a new bookmobile. The branches were still under the supervision of the County librarian and visited them once a month. [23]

Creston Library[edit | edit source]

Deposit Station[edit | edit source]

Apple Creek[edit | edit source]
  • By 1937 became a deposit station.
Dalton[edit | edit source]
  • By 1937 became a deposit station.
Fredericksburg School[edit | edit source]

Doylestown Library[edit | edit source]

Rittman High School Library[edit | edit source]
  • 1936 - Rittman High School Library became a deposit station almost immediately, had a circulation of 7,992 books. Additional deposit stations were setup in 1936 with $2,500 from the County Budget Commission and an extra $400 from the State of Ohio.
  • 1937 - Became a deposit station almost immediately, had a circulation of 7,992 books.
Sterling[edit | edit source]
  • By 1937 became a deposit station.
West Salem[edit | edit source]
  • By 1937 became a deposit station.


Rittman Library[edit | edit source]

Shreve Library[edit | edit source]

Wooster High School Branch[edit | edit source]

  • 1910 -
  • 1933 - Miss Virginia Kerr reported that although there were not many new books circulation was good. She was also giving lessons in library science as part of the English curriculum.
  • 1937 - Miss Margaret Haunstein became librarian at the high school. [24]

Film Department[edit | edit source]

Club room & Meeting room[edit | edit source]

  • 1937 - A large room located in the basement was equipped for various group and quickly became a popular meeting place. [25]
  • 1937 - A problem which was brought to attention appeared in Mrs. Eugenia Glenn's report and would trouble librarians for the next 30 years was a lack of meeting room space. [26]
  • 1939 - The room was used 56 times [27]
  • 1941 - The club room was used for carious courses in first aid and nursing. [28]

Museum[edit | edit source]

  • Housed on the 2nd floor. The museum was of special interest to James Mullins and George J. Schwartz
  • Sample of items in collected included: Dr. J. H. Todd's collection of Ohio archaeological specimens; Rev. Jacob Reis' relics of "Cameron" in West Africa; James Mullins's "fine collection" of stuffed birds which he had purchased at the St. Louis World's Fair for $2,500. [29]
  • Museum officially opened in 1918, but many visitors were welcome to see the collection as it grew during the early years. Miss Myrtle Allen, librarian in her annual reports credits the museum with drawing many people to the library. [30]

Reference Department[edit | edit source]

  • 1912 - The reference room was the most popular place in the library. The latest fiction was also very important in bringing people to the library. Miss Myrtle Allan began a duplicate pay collection in November. Two copies of the most popular late fiction were purchased. One copy was place on the shelves for regular circulation while the other was place behind the counter and could be borrowed for the cost of $0.02 per day. When the books had been paid for in this way, it was place on regular shelves and another new fiction book was purchased in its place. From November 1912 to January 1913, $8.42 was paid by patrons to read the latest novels, and in the yearly report of 1916, the librarian could report that a total of seventy-seven books had been purchased for the duplicates pay collection with 44 haven been placed on the regular shelves. [31]

Friends of the Library[edit | edit source]

Slogans[edit | edit source]

Historical documents[edit | edit source]

Timeline[edit | edit source]

  • 1903 - January, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library at the library as Mr. Mullins to write to Andrew Carnegie, the famous philanthropist, asking for funds for a new building. Mr. Mullins was reluctant, but agreed to write the letter the next day. He quickly received a reply back offering $12,000 which the Trustees decided insufficient for the building project. Again, they urged Mr. Mullins to write and ask for $15,000 which was the sum finally granted. Mr. Carnegie's only requirement for the library (which never bore his name) was that Wooster raise $500 a year for the building's maintenance.[32]
  • 1903 - April 13, Board of Trustees WCPL Library formed a committee to confer with the Wooster Board of Education to see if they would assume responsibility of the library. This would provide the library with real estate tax collection according to "An act authorizing Boards of Education to provide library privileges for city, village, and special school districts" passed by the Ohio Legislature on October 17, 1902. It is worthy to note [33]
  • 1903 - May 21, The Wooster Board of Education accepted and appointed the same Board of Trustees of the library. The library now becomes a school district library. Each teacher was issued a circulation card for school use that the teacher could check out for students' use the books required in the pupils' reading course. [34]
  • 1903 - June 23, Board of Trustees WCPL Library examined several buildings sites and chose 304 N. Market St., Wooster, Ohio which they purchased from John Fawcett Larwill for $4,500. [35]
  • 1905 - April 15, Della M. Dice was elected librarian and given a salary of $30 a month. Mrs. Elizabeth McBride became her assistant. The Trustees received other applicants during this period, but no word is given why no action was taken. Rules for the Wooster Public Library and Museum [36]
  • 1905 - May, the building was ready and a dedication ceremony was held. The cost of the construction was $14,262, add to that $4,500 for land, architect's fee of $525 and other miscellaneous expenses make the total cost of the library $23,000. [37]
  • 1905 - Wooster Free Library Association changes name to Wooster Public Library and Museum
  • 1906 - September, Della M. Dice left the position and Myrtle Allen started as the librarian
  • 1907 - April, Miss Daisy Darr became the librarian and Myrtle Allen as her substitute
  • 1909 - January, Miss Myrtle Allen once again became librarian and continued until 1923.
  • 1909 - Miss Birde Everhart became a substitute and sometimes assistance librarian and stayed until her retirement in 1948 giving almost 40 years of service to the library. [38]
  • 1910 - Traveling library department was established for each month of the school year. A collection of 30-50 books in a small book case was sent to each school in the city. Students could checkout the material and take the books home. [39]
  • 1915 - Contagious disease caused the library to close
  • 1918 - Museum officially opened on the 2nd floor of Wooster Public Library and Museum. Sample of items in collected included: Dr. J. H. Todd's collection of Ohio archaeological specimens; Rev. Jacob Reis' relics of "Cameron" in West Africa; James Mullins's "fine collection" of stuffed birds which he had purchased at the St. Louis World's Fair for $2,500. [40]
  • 1918 - The library partnered with the college library and conducted a campaign to collect books to send to the soldiers during WWII. The public library was able to collect 2,831 books while the college added 600 more to be sent to Camp Green, North Carolina, Newport News, Virginia and Hoboken, New Jersey. [41]
  • 1918-1919 - Contagious disease caused the library to close for a longer period during the fall and winter.. Virtually all of Wayne County and United States came to a halt. [42]
  • 1923 - Mrs. Eugenia Glenn gave teachers lists of 30 titles of books to be read by students in third through sixth grades. The students were to read and report on four books from each list each month and received cred for this extra reading on the monthly report card. The librarian spoke to parent-teacher groups about the program and felt encouraged by this partnership between the school and library. [43]
  • 1923 - Younger children were not forgotten. One story hour was held and volunteers told stories and gave talks on such topics as China, minerals, Indian relics, and Ohio geography. [44]
  • 1925 - The partnership between the schools and the library increased this year by the library establishing its first school branch in the new high school building. G. C. Maurer, Superintendent of schools and also a library trustee informed Mrs. Eugenia Glenn that the Wooster Board of Education would furnish the room, physical equipment, light, heat and a janitor while the librarian was supply the books to supplement the high school's collection. [45]
  • 1925 - Miss Helen M. Watterson was the first high school librarian and maintained a collection of 1609 books that first years. [46]
  • 1928 June, Mrs. Eugenia Glenn was granted a leave of absence to begin in September. Her substitute for the year was Miss Eleanor Ricker of the Los Angeles Public Library. Miss Ricker accomplished several things during her year in Wooster, Ohio. Material was added to weak parts of the collection: music, art, biography, psychology and new reference books were purchased. Fall 1928, arrangements were made for all third through sixth grade students of Wooster City Schools to visit the library and museum as part of their school work. [47]
  • 1928 - Board of Trustees WCPL Library approved the use of library grounds for Sunday evening church services and other recreational programs associated with churches. [48]
  • 1928 - Problems arose due to the closing of the library on Sunday afternoons and the resignation of O. H. Foss, Museum curator which facilitated closing the museum. [49]
  • 1929 - With the return of Mrs. Eugenia Glenn's the Board of Trustees established a new policy for library employment. After September 1, 1929 there would be 1 full time librarian and 1 full time assistant librarian who would be hired on a yearly basis. Bother were to be graduates of accredited library schools. Miss Beatrice MacDonald (later Mrs. Beatrice Graham. was the first assistance librarian hired under this new policy. [50]
  • 1931 - September, After the closing of the museum in 1928, the museum did not reopen until the hiring of Alvin Rich
  • 1931-32 - The work of the library went on although each year there was a shortage of funds, a shrinking book collection and changes in the work schedules due to lack of money.
  • 1932 - Financially it was trying times. The tax collection for 1932 was extremely small and in the reallocation of the fiscal year meant that the sum which was finally set at $5,100 (compared to $8490 the previous year) had to pay expenses for 18 months. Money was not received until August 1932 and there was concern during the early part of the year that the library would have to be closed. The library only remained open because of the surplus of money on hand from 1931, loans from the Citizens National Bank, The, and the activities of interested citizens. [51]
  • 1932 - May, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library voted to close the library until more funds became available, hopefully in June. The last day to be open was set for Saturday, May 7.
  • 1932 - May 8, A meeting of citizens was called after the evening church services and at that meeting $150 was pledged and a committee headed by Professor A. A. Johnston appointed to raise more money to keep the library open. [52]
  • 1932 - May 20, The Board of Trustees had been provided with sufficient funds to keep the library open afternoons 1 PM to 6 PM during the summer months. Citizen raised $437.07 which paid some of the bills until the first intangibles payment of $2,579 was received in August. Another payment was due in November but still had not arrived by February, 1933. Citizens helped by donating money and book individually and through their clubs. Although, the book collection grew smaller with books being discarded and no replaced, the library continued to function on at least a part-time basis. [53]
  • 1933 - September, Despite the problems of the depression this was the beginning of extension work in Wayne County, Ohio with free library service being extended to all inhabitants of this county. Because library service was available to the entire county, the library could benefit in all of the intangibles collected here. [54]
  • 1934 - January, the Civilian Works Act supplied a worker whose hours were not to exceed 30 hours a week at $0.30 hour. [55]
  • 1935 - Federal Emergency Relief Agency worker was employed for the first half of the year.
  • 1935 - By this year, 56 school rooms were supplied with library books. Many of these were one room schoolhouses were collections were exchanged each month. other collections within the county included the Civilian Conservation Corps camps. A CCC home station was located in Marshallville, Ohio and the Federal Emergency Relief Agency in Doylestown, Ohio. Extension work had become an important part of the program. The budget for 1935 included equipment of a room in the basement of the library for a collection of books for county extension. During the summer, much time had been spent in starting this collection. [56]
  • 1936 - Rittman High School Library became a deposit station almost immediately, had a circulation of 7,992 books. Additional deposit stations were setup in 1936 with $2,500 from the County Budget Commission and an extra $400 from the State of Ohio.
    • 1937 - Became a deposit station almost immediately, had a circulation of 7,992 books.
  • 1937 - February, The Works Progress Administration allotted money for a mending project on the library's collection. Ten people were to be employed with the supervisor receiving a salary of $85. Also, part of the money needed to hire a cataloger or other trained assistant for the library.
  • 1937 - Rittman was the most enthusiastic about obtaining service. Over 100 people gathered in Rittman to hear Miss Mildred Sandoe, Ohio State Library, Consultant talk to them about how money could be secured from the Wayne County Budget Commission for more extension work through the Wooster Public Library and Museum. She also visited Mr. Yoder, the Wayne County Auditor and explained the greater cost of operating separate libraries in each town instead of organizing them through Wooster, Ohio.

Other interested communities that requested library assistance: Smithville, Ohio, Doylestown, Ohio, and Shreve, Ohio

  • 1937 - February, Planning for the Rittman library which was housed in the 'new' community building in Rittman, Ohio was started by Miss Mildred Sandoe
  • 1937 - June 5, Rittman Public Library is the first branch that opened. Located in the 'new' community building of Rittman, Ohio with Miss Mollie Bell as first librarian.
  • 1937 - March 4, Furniture for the first Rittman library was purchased from the Ohio Reformatory. 1,100 books had been secured from the high school library collection as a starter collection.
  • 1938 - October, Works Progress Administration 3 members of WPA photographed the author cards for all adult class books.
  • 1941 - Library participated in the Victory Book Campaign with the college library.
  • 1941 - New strategies were made to interest parents of preschool and primary school children in books. More picture books were purchased and displayed. Groups of Second grade children were given library instruction before issued their first library card. [57]
  • 1941 - The Board of Trustees WCPL Library started talking to school officials about targeting older readers. [58]
  • 1941 - WPA Project for the county ended which meant the loss of a clerical worker. The library was able to find monies to add the worker to the regular payroll. [59]
  • 1941 - July, William E. Bartel, first extension librarian was called to Army camp. Replaced by Helen Vallish was able to drive the bookmobile. The Janitor went to work in a defense plant. [60]
  • 1941 - Main library roof repaired. [61]
  • 1942 - Library participated in the Victory Book Campaign with the college library to collect books and send them to various military camps. The local fire department collected & covered large boxes which were places in buildings for contributions from citizens. A total of 2,500 volumes were sent. [62]
  • 1942 - The library offered 1 week where books could be returned without fine. [63]
  • 1942 - It was finally decided to turn the Wooster High School library operation over to the Schools in Wooster, Ohio.
  • 1942 - Main library redecorated. [64]
  • 1943 - August 5, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library accepted with regret the resignation of Mrs. Eugenia Glenn. Mrs. Glenn had 20 productive years enlarging the ideas of library services especially the extension work. In retirement, she still served as temporary librarian. [65]
  • 1943 - August 5, Helen Sebeika the Children's librarian was hired as head librarian. [66]
  • 1944 - Helen Sebeika reported that Wayne County residents paid $0.30 per capita for library services; whereas, the state average was $0.78 per capita. The book collection was insufficient and should have been $70,000. 70 periodicals she felt was also inadequate.[67]
  • 1945 - Recommendation of 1 more professional staff, a more aggressive public relations campaign, maintenance of the book collection at a higher degree of usefulness and strengthening the branches. [68]
  • 1945 - Up to this point Branches received no budget of their own. They were provided books and librarians from the Main library. The buildings were funded by the towns they were located in. At times, too little supervision and help from Wooster a problem Helen Sebeika hoped to solve. [69]
  • 1945 - May, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library voted to have Rules for the Wooster Public Library and Museum (1945)
  • 1945 - November, Miss Helen Sebeika resigned as head librarian and Miss Bernath took served until Miss Ruth Minglin came in January 1946. [70]
  • 1946 - April 18, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library and Ruth Minglin issued an invitation to a public meeting to discuss "the efficiency and planning of library service in Wooster and Wayne County." 35 people attended (Board, staff from Main library & Branches, School officials and interested citizens. Dr. Williams, President of Board, spoke about rising prices following the War and the impact it would have at the library... suggesting an increase in revenue of 25% by 1947 to continue at present level. Other needs: more staff, branch supervisor, cataloger and more books. [71]
  • 1947 - The needs mentioned in 1946 led the library to ask for $16,000 increase in budget. It was decided Dr. Williams would appoint a steering committee of persons around the community. It was never carried out. [72]
  • 1947 - February, Mrs. Faith Stoughton was hired as County librarian.
  • 1947 - March, the Head librarian Miss Ruth Minglin resigned.
  • 1947 - April, Miss Mary Merritt was hired. Although, she could not begin until September. So, Mrs. Eugenia Glenn agreed to come back from retirement and work during the summer. * 1947 - The needs mentioned in 1946 led the library to ask for $16,000 increase in budget. It was decided Dr. Williams would appoint a steering committee of persons around the community. It was never carried out. [73]
  • 1947 - Miss Mary Merritt listed many accomplishments during this year: increased budget, better salaries, new bookmobile ordered, participation in a film service, "representative collection on family relations and sex education." [74]
  • 1947 - The needs mentioned in 1946 led the library to ask for $16,000 increase in budget. It was decided Dr. Williams would appoint a steering committee of persons around the community. It was never carried out. [75]
  • 1948 - January, Miss Mildred Sandoe first discussed with the Board of Trustees WCPL Library the possibilities of organizing a county district instead of a school district library.
  • 1948 - January 6, Mr. Bodenbender presented a report to the Wooster Board of Education. [76]
  • 1948 - February 12, At the Board of Trustees WCPL Library decided to study the action of other libraries during the year to decide if the county district would be preferable. This debate to change from a school to county district library system would continue for the next 10 years. Another item to consume much of the Trustees time was the Wooster library building. [77]
  • 1948 - Organization of a Friends of the Library. First meeting with 20 charter members. The formation of the Freiends group was to make the community more aware of library activities and ways in which clubs could help. [78]
  • 1949 - December 8, "Discussion of the general physical condition of the entire building resulted in recommendation that the building contact the city engineer for a building check and an immediate plan be formed to start building repair." It was discovered very early that repairing the building would not be sufficient. [79]
  • 1949 - Mary Merritt's observation of what the community was ready is divided into 2 groups: "light fiction & mystery (group) and a substantial group who follow reviews and pattern their reading upon heavy fiction and non-fiction." "Patrons were requesting more technical and self-help and non-fiction."[80]
  • 1950 - May, Mrs. Faith Stoughton resigned as County librarian. Replaced by Lawrence Huber as County librarian. [81]
  • 1951 - New service added was to bring books and a way to read them while in bed was brought to hospital patients. [82]
  • 1951 - March, Miss Mary Merritt suggested that a plan for building repair be formulated and carried through. A.) Repairs: Interior and external painting; B.) Shades and blinds for cataloging room; C.) Renewing most of floors in the building ; D.) Replacement of magazine racks ; E.) New driveway & parking yard. [83]
  • 1952 - Lawrence Huber reported the bookmobile served 16 schools and 14 town stops on 3 week cycles. In addition, providing loans to 1st & 2nd grades and one room schools on 6 week cycles. The County librarian still borrowed from the State Library of Ohio, the number of books borrowed dropped significantly due to an increased budget in the county. [84]
  • 1952 - Wayne County's rural schools were beginning to consolidate causing immediate problems due to the distant locations. [85]
  • 1952 - An experiment in the elimination of fines for children using the bookmobile.
  • 1953 - Miss Mary Merritt, mentioned in her Annual Report that the "comments are so complimentary that it should make the members of the Board feel that the many hours of time and worry have been worthwhile." [86]
  • 1954 - The collection of $1,424.49 in fines brought in by the secretary who had been making home visits to check on long overdue books. [87]
  • 1956 - May, Miss Mary Merritt's resignation was given and the effective as of August 31, 1956. [88]
  • 1956 - September 1, Miss Katherine Schantz became head library. She was an Orrville native and previously worked at the Ashland Public Library]. Miss Francis McCulloch previously worked with Miss Schantz at Ashland Public Library] and came with her to work at Wooster Public Library and Museum. [89]
  • 1957 - Mrs. Alice Clareson was hired; Miss Doris Lehman later became Mrs. Doris Reynolds. [90]
  • 1958 - the Rittman Friends of the Library and the Doylestown Friends of the Library requested to change to a county district library. [91]
  • 1958 - January, Wooster Public Library was a school district library since 1903. The school district served the county residents but because it remained under the jurisdiction of the Wooster Board of Education, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library were chosen only from the Schools in Wooster, Ohio. The State Library of Ohio advised changing from a school county district library system, but this was never acted on by the Trustees. [92]\
  • 1958 - the Wooster Main Library floors experienced flooding Spring and Fall along with Roof leaking and plaster falling. [93]
  • 1958 - May 15, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library decided it was unwise to change to a county district library. [94]
  • 1958 - June 26, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library reaffirmed the decision to stay a school district library with noone voting no. They also voted to notify the mayors of Rittman, Ohio, Doylestown, Ohio, Creston, Ohio and Shreve, Ohio deciding that the library would remain a school district library. [95]
  • 1959 - April, the Library Study Commission was to have reported to the Trustees with its findings and recommendations. But, there had been no committee due to a lack of interest. Letters were sent to all Friends of the Library groups in the county, Branches and 100 letters were distributed through the Bookmobile asking about improvements. The results were no one from the Branches wanted to serve on a committee and only 5 letters suggesting improvement had been received. Of these letters, 4 suggested changing to a county district library. The consensus seemed to be "general approval of library activities in the county at large," but, "the discontent seemed to be centered in Rittman, less in Doylestown and non in the northern part of the county around Creston. [96]
  • 1959 - November 18, the Board of Trustees WCPL Library felt this was an unwise move and controversy raged throughout the county for several months. Amid threats of a motion to be placed on the ballot in November and publicity that extended beyond the county, the Board of Trustees, after considerable debate and negotiations, finally signed a resolution on November 18, 1959 that would change the legal status of the library.
  • 1960 - January 1, the Wayne County District Public Library was created.

Warranty Deed[edit | edit source]

Volume 148 Page 42[edit | edit source]

Know all Men by these Presents, That I, John Fawcett Larwill, unmarried, the grantor for the consideration of Forty Five Hundred Dollars, ($4500.00) received to my full satisfaction of James Mullins, A. D. Metz, George J. Schwartz, Charles Haupert, William O. Beebe and H. D. Stauffer The Board of Trustees of the Wooster Free Public Library of Wooster, Ohio and School District thereof, the grantees, do give, grant, Bargain, Sell and Convey unto the said grantees, their successors and assigns, the following described premises: Situated in the City of Wooster, County of Wayne, State of Ohio, and known as and being part of In lot number Sixteen Hundred and twenty eight (1628) and being described as follows: beginning at the South East corner of said lot thence North on the East line of said lot parallel with North Market Street one Hundred and Five (105) feet, thence West one Hundred and eighty (180) feet and being on the South line of the lot and premises now owned by Ada M. Ryall, thence South one Hundred and Five (105) feet and on a line parallel with the line of said lot o n North Market Street thence East parallel with Larwill Street one Hundred and eighty (180) feet to the South East corner of siad lot the place of beginning be the same more or less, but subject to all legal highways.

To Have and to Hold the above granted and bargained premises, with the appurtenances therunto belong, unto the said grantees, their successors and assigns forever. And I, John Fawcett Larwill, the said grantor, do for myself and my heirs, executors and administrators, covenant with the said grantee, their successors and assigns, that at and until the ensealing of these Presents I am well seized of the above described Premises at a good and indefeasible estate in Fee Simple, and have good right to bargain and sell the same in manner and form as above written; that the same are Free and Clear from all Incumbrances whatsoever, and that I will Warrant and Defend said Premises, with the appurtenances thereunto belonging, to the said grantees, their successors and assigns forever, against all lawful claims and demands whatsoever. In Witness Whereof, I hereunto set my hand, this 23rd day of June in the year of our Lord, One Thousand Nine Hundred and Three. J. Fawcett Larwill

Signed and acknowledged in presence of Richard Landers Ross W. Funck

The State of Ohio Wayne County SS. Before me, a Notary Public in ward for said County, personally appeared the above named John Fawcett Larwill an unmarried man, who acknowledged they did sign the foregoing instrument, and that the same is their free act and deed.

In Testimony Wherof, I have hereunto set my hand and official seal, at Wooster this 23rd day of June A.D. 1903. Ross W. Funck Notary Public

Volume 148 Page 43[edit | edit source]

Received and Recorded June 23rd, 1903 at 3:15 o'clock, P.M. Lewis C. Franks Recorder

Gallery[edit | edit source]

1903 Deed Image[edit | edit source]

John Fawcett Larwill sells Wooster Lot 1628 to the Board of Trustees of the Wooster Free Public Library for $4500. The deed was signed on 23rd day of June A.D. 1903. It was received and recorded on the same day at 3:15 o'clock, P.M.


1905 History Images[edit | edit source]

Original 1905 History of the Wooster Public Library and Museum, written by Henry D. Stauffer

Carnegie building, Exterior[edit | edit source]

Carnegie building, Interior[edit | edit source]

Business Letterheads[edit | edit source]

Business Photos[edit | edit source]

Documents[edit | edit source]

Newspaper articles[edit | edit source]

Newspaper full-text articles[edit | edit source]

1903[edit | edit source]

1905[edit | edit source]

1906[edit | edit source]

1907[edit | edit source]

1908[edit | edit source]

1911[edit | edit source]

1917[edit | edit source]

1918[edit | edit source]

1919[edit | edit source]

Newspaper ads[edit | edit source]

Newspaper citations with no attached images[edit | edit source]

  • April 01, 1903: "New Books: A Nice List in the Wooster Public Library" by Unknown, Wooster Republican, p. 8, Col 5.

References[edit | edit source]

  1. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 18.
  2. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 21.
  3. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 22.
  4. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 24.
  5. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 32.
  6. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 36.
  7. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 35.
  8. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 41.
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  10. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 32, 34.
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  14. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 41
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  23. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 41
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  30. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 15.
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  38. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 17.
  39. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 18.
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  58. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 36.
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  88. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 45.
  89. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 45.
  90. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 48.
  91. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 45.
  92. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 45.
  93. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 47.
  94. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 45.
  95. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 45.
  96. History of the Wayne County Public Library: a research paper submitted to the Kent State University Library School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Library Science, by Joyce A. McKnight. June, 1970, p. 48.
  97. Wooster Daily Republican. Wooster, Ohio, 1917-01-04, p. 6
  98. Wooster Daily Republican. Wooster, Ohio, 1018-07-03, p. 3
  99. Wooster Republican. Wooster, Ohio, 1919-01-02, p. 4.

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